Discrimination

Friday, 5 March 2021

Why for some having a Roma neighbour is a problem?

Roma face discrimination in everyday life, in daily contacts with fellow citizens, in employment, social protection, health care and education. And yet, they rarely report discrimination, and that needs to be changed, say new reports published by Minority Rights Group Europe (MRGE).  

All the three reports that MRGE is launching this week (“Roma in Hungary: The Challenges of Discrimination”, “Roma in Republic of Serbia: The Challenges of Discrimination” and “Roma in the Republic of Serbia and Hungary: The Challenges of Discrimination - A Comparative Report”) summarize and analyse the findings of two pieces of research which were conducted in the framework of the REILA project, coordinated by MRGE with the participation of two experienced partners: Praxis in Serbia and Idetartozunk (We Belong Here) in Hungary.

‘The research, that was carried out in Serbia and Hungary from October to December 2020 shows that in both countries, prejudice and negative stereotypes towards Roma are the main reasons for their discrimination.’ says Zsofia Farkas, MRG Europe’s Managing Director. ‘Roma face rejection and social exclusion from an early age, a situation that often continues throughout their lives.’

According to one study, in Serbia only around half of respondents reported that they would accept a Roma as their neighbour and only a fifth would be willing to marry a person of Roma origin. Similarly, in Hungary, according to a recent survey, 54 per cent of the respondents stated that they would not accept a Roma family member, 44 per cent that they would not want a Roma neighbour, and 27 per cent that they would not accept Roma as citizens of the country.

The report provides a thorough overview of the position of Roma in Serbia and Hungary, prejudices and forms of discrimination they face and obstacles in access to justice. As such, it also gives a comprehensive set of recommendations and calls on all relevant stakeholders, national and local decision-makers, EU decision-makers, Roma activists and Roma CSOs, legal practitioners and the media, to undertake measures within their powers to establish an efficient system of social inclusion and of institutional fight against discrimination.

‘Only a synergy of ideas, policies, measures and activities of all actors will contribute to improving the position of Roma, eliminating prejudices towards them and creating a more favourable environment and a more equal society for all,’ says Marijana Lukovic, Executive Director of Praxis.

Read the reports:

Roma in Hungary: The Challenges of Discrimination” (in English and Hungarian)

Roma in Republic of Serbia: The Challenges of Discrimination” (in English and Serbian)

Roma in Republic of Serbia: The Challenges of Discrimination” (in English and Serbian)

Roma in the Republic of Serbia and Hungary: The Challenges of Discrimination - A Comparative Report” (in English, Hungarian and Serbian)

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Praxis means action
Praxis means action
Praxis means action
Praxis means action